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Democratic Theories
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Conflict in the 'South China Sea': Lessons from the Dene Peoples and the Arctic Conflict?

Conflict in the ‘South China Sea’: Lessons from the Dene Peoples and the Arctic Conflict? Originally published September 26, 2011, by the Centre for Strategic Research and Analysis (online April 1, 2014). [John Raulston Saul and Stephen Kakfwi spoke about “Aboriginal Sovereignty in the Arctic” on January 13, 2011, at the Munk School for Global […]

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The End of War? Global Citizenship and Changes to Conflict

The End of War? Global Citizenship and Changes to Conflict Originally published December 11, 2011, by the Centre for Strategic Research and Analysis (online March 31, 2014). [In reading about global democracy and its prospects for peace I came to think about how societies have changed, in large part due to technologies relating to media, […]

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Gaddafi and Libya – a case for just intervention?

Full militaristic intervention cannot be justified on the grounds that this is a ‘just war’. We are then left with the option to intervene militarily in a smaller way or not to intervene militarily at all.

Gaddafi and Libya – a case for just intervention? Originally published by openDemocracy, April 1, 2011. [This short essay was borne out of an urge to “speak out of” the expression of international democracy that I saw happening in how many people, around the world, were relating to Libyans and vice versa during their moment […]

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Constitutional Legitimacy: an International Ill and Gap in the Literature?

Constitutional Legitimacy: an International Ill and Gap in the Literature? Originally published February 25, 2011, by the Centre for Strategic Research and Analysis (online April 1, 2014). [This short essay is now, thankfully, due for an update. Advances in the academic literature on constitutions and their democratic legitimacy but also the uptake of democratic innovations […]

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Nation-state or country-state: how do we discuss belonging in an age of fluidity?

The use of the term "nation-state" confuses current debate around countries, states and nations. We need new rhetorical structures to help us make sense of this age of uncertainty, where the mass movement of individuals has caused the erosion of the homogenous cores around which nation-states around the world were once built.

Nation-state or country-state: how do we discuss belonging in an age of fluidity? The extant literature is, in my opinion, sufficiently clear that the term “nation” and its pairing with the term “state” is in need of considerable reconsideration. There are two substantive areas of thought which might do well to illustrate my point: the […]

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Suppressed Democracy in China: Theoretical Rationalisation using a Cosmopolitan Methodology

Surpressed Democracy in China: Theoretical Rationalisation using a Cosmopolitan Methodology Originally published February 9, 2011, by the Centre for Strategic Research and Analysis (online April 1, 2014). [How red-cheeked one can get running into a short, brash, essay written by their younger self. Nearly ten years have passed since this small push in a magazine […]

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As Berlusconi exits, is democratic reform the next real step for Europe?

As Berlusconi exits, is democratic reform the next real step for Europe? Originally published by The Conversation, November 11, 2011. [The seed for TaxTrack—an idea that would be published years later, in a different forum, and with Australia in mind (but it can be applied in other contexts, too)— is found in this short essay. Having […]

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Competitive Regulation: Stepping Outside the Public/Private Policy Debate

Competitive Regulation: Stepping Outside the Public/Private Policy Debate Originally published August 17, 2011, by the Centre for Strategic Research and Analysis (online March 31, 2014). [The spark for this short essay came from reading into two discrete sets of literature: that on non-violent democracy and the other on harmless democracy. To be fair, it’s really […]

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